Bowl is fitting Emily tribute

Emanuel Joseph Taylor and his wife Mary Ellen sold chocolates on the street on the day of her funeral in a special Nestle dish. Their grandson Lindsay Taylor has been in to tell the story after seeing the article about the mayor commissioning an Emily dish.'Photo shows Emanuel in the centre bottom, with the moustache.
Emanuel Joseph Taylor and his wife Mary Ellen sold chocolates on the street on the day of her funeral in a special Nestle dish. Their grandson Lindsay Taylor has been in to tell the story after seeing the article about the mayor commissioning an Emily dish.'Photo shows Emanuel in the centre bottom, with the moustache.

A GLASS bowl commissioned to commemorate Suffragette Emily Wilding Davison has proved perfectly fitting.

Morpeth Mayor Joan Tebbutt announced that she would commission a bowl, known as Emily’s Dish, to pass chocolates around Morpeth Town Council alongside the traditional snuff box.

Now local man Lindsay Taylor has come forward to say such a dish was used by his grandparents to sell chocolates on the streets of the town during Emily’s funeral 100 years ago.

Emanuel Joseph Taylor, known as Mattie, who was a founder member of the Labour Party, and his wife Mary Ellen, ran a sweet shop in Goosehill at the time of the event.

Mr Taylor said: “My grandparents on the day of the funeral were selling chocolates off a Nestlé glass dish.

“My grandad was a strong union man and by 1912 he had run out of pits to work in so he moved to Oldgate with my grandma and set up a little shop.

“Perhaps Coun Tebbutt could find out the design of the dish and use it for her design. I’m pretty sure from his political background that my grandad would have been more than happy to go along with that because I think he would have wanted women to have the vote and been in favour of Emily.”

Mattie, pictured front centre, was killed at the Battle of the Somme in 1916, six weeks after the photograph was taken.