Forget New York, now it’s CSI Newminster

Morpeth's Newminster Middle School pupils Liam Dunn and Louise Brett (both 12) taking part in a forensic experiment to track down criminals.
Morpeth's Newminster Middle School pupils Liam Dunn and Louise Brett (both 12) taking part in a forensic experiment to track down criminals.
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SCHOOL pupils turned detectives to find out who took off with some tasty treats.

And many of them correctly identified that a teacher had stolen the missing strawberry tarts.

But she wasn’t in trouble as children at Newminster and Chantry Middle Schools and Technology Colleges in Morpeth were doing a special crime scene investigation exercise as part of National Science and Engineering Week.

Clues were left by the culprit, including a post-it note saying thank you, and 140 students working in small groups did a series of tests using the latest technology.

They included fibre analysis under the microscope, a finger print study and an ink analysis to work out which of the eight suspects committed the ‘crime’.

Year 8 pupils also received forensic science and chemistry lectures from Northumbria University staff at King Edward VI School.

Acting Assistant Head at Newminster Sumeena Razzaqi said: “It was great to give our students hands-on experience to find out how the police use forensics to track down criminals.

“There were a few red herrings along the way, but the culprit, Miss Cole, was positive for each test and many students correctly identified her.

“Activities such as this help to make science more fun and exciting for our students and when asked for feedback they were very positive about the whole experience.”

Among the other events to mark National Science and Engineering Week were visits from Technology Tom, who instructed Year 5 pupils in building towers, mechanical toys and making vacuum-formed cup cake holders, and the Creepy Crawly Roadshow.

Students also made their own tall hats for a Mad Hatter’s Tea Party.