KEVI pupils go with the FLOW

Winners of the FLOW Challenge from The King Edward VI School, Morpeth 'L - RJames Carr, Andrew Templey, Craig Martin, Ricky Thompson and James Famelton
Winners of the FLOW Challenge from The King Edward VI School, Morpeth 'L - RJames Carr, Andrew Templey, Craig Martin, Ricky Thompson and James Famelton

A GROUP of Morpeth students are riding the wave of success after winning a regional competition.

Four schools from across the North East were selected to take part in The FLOW Challenge, where they needed to design a contraption that responds to the River Tyne and its environment.

The team of Year 11 students from King Edward VI School — James Carr, James Famelton, Craig Martin, Andrew Templey and Richard Thompson — came up with The Wave, which measures the speed of the river using a water wheel.

To show changes in speed, a wave shape made up of blue LEDs would move across a screen.

They presented their work to a team of judges at Gallery North in Newcastle and took away a hamper of technology goodies worth more than £300 for coming first.

Before the event, pupils from Years 10 and 11 took part in a series of workshops led by Owl Project and the Climate Change Schools Project to look at a series of micro-challenges and discussions on the themes of invention, environment and technology.

Student Voice, Leadership & Enrichment Co-ordinator Victoria Najafi said: “We are delighted to have won the FLOW Challenge. All students have worked completely independently since September on their invention.

“The students have been greatly inspired by the Owl Project and certainly hope to be given the opportunity to further develop their work in the future. It has been a tremendous experience.”

FLOW is part of Artists taking the lead, a series of 12 public art commissions across the UK to celebrate the London 2012 Cultural Olympiad, funded by Arts Council England.

In Newcastle there will be a floating waterwheel on the River Tyne, which will be open to the public during summer 2012. The wheel will house musical instruments, all built from sustainable materials, which will be powered by the flow of the river.

Project Lead for FLOW Ed Carter said: “It was a great event and really exciting to see how the schools had responded to the project with such innovative ideas and put so much time into their work.

“The team from King Edward VI School came up with an excellent proposal, which was not only visually and technically impressive but also reflected environmental information in a very creative manner.”