Tributes to respected former councillor

Dorothy McBryde, who lived in Morpeth for more than 50 years, died peacefully in hospital on April 12, at the age of 101.
Dorothy McBryde, who lived in Morpeth for more than 50 years, died peacefully in hospital on April 12, at the age of 101.
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Tributes have been paid to a former Mayor of Castle Morpeth.

Dorothy McBryde died peacefully in hospital on April 12, at the age of 101. A number of Morpeth residents attended a service of thanksgiving, organised by her family, at St James’s Church last week.

Born Dorothy Hunter, she was from a farming family and lived in the Hartburn and Ulgham areas. In 1943, she married Marshall McBryde in St John’s Church, Longhirst.

They lived on a farm at Pegswood Moor. Marshall died in 1965 and a year later, Mrs McBryde moved to Thorp Avenue. She then moved to another address in the same street in the early 1970s.

Other immediate family include daughter Sheila Hulbert, son William (who died eight years ago), three grandchildren and three great-grandchildren.

Dorothy got involved in local efforts to prevent any development taking place at Tommy’s Field and she was then asked to be a councillor.

She was elected to Morpeth Borough Council in 1972 and then the Castle Morpeth authority – which was wound up when the Northumberland unitary council came into effect in April 2009 – in 1974.

Dorothy served until 1987 and was Mayor of the area that also included villages such as Stannington, Widdrington Station, Longhorsley and Lynemouth in 1985-86.

One of the highlights during this 12-month period was Princess Anne officially opening the borough council offices in the Kylins.

Other activities in the community included her involvement with the Morpeth Cancer Research UK Fund-raising Committee and running a luncheon club for Morpeth Age Concern at St James’ Community Centre.

She was also a founder member of the former Business and Professional Women Morpeth group and a member of local U3A groups.

Sheila said: “My mother continued to live independently until almost the end of her life and her interest in the town never waned.

“We have been very grateful for all the messages of condolence we have received from people whose lives she had touched in a positive way over the many years she served the community. I think she would have been surprised and delighted that she was remembered so fondly.”