THE CARE ACT: Carers need more support

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Is the Care Act failing disabled people and carers?

Imagine having a disability and relying on a carer to eat, get dressed or leave the house. Imagine having to give up work to care for a loved one with a disability.

Just over a year ago, the Care Act was introduced to safeguard the well-being of carers and those they care for.

I work for the national disability charity Revitalise. We did some research and found that the Care Act has done little to improve lives, and in many cases people are now worse off.

We found that more than half of local councils are spending less on disability services than before, and they’re also cutting their spending on respite services.

Meanwhile one of the core principles of the Care Act, to ensure all carers and disabled people get assessments, isn’t being met.

Sadly, this is having an impact on the well-being of people with disabilities and those who look after them, four out of 10 are now struggling to make ends meet, while two thirds have had to cut back their respite and social time, leaving them more isolated.

We believe there should be more support for disabled people and carers.

Our fear is that until local authorities get squarely behind the principles of the Care Act - and they get the funding to do so - disabled people and carers will continue to struggle to achieve even the most basic quality of life.

Revitalise provides respite breaks for disabled people and carers at three accessible centres around the UK, so we know just how vital regular respite can be.

If readers would like more information about Revitalise or would like to support our vital work, please call us on 0303 303 0145 or visit www.revitalise.org.uk

Sarah Wiley,

Revitalise, www.revitalise.org.uk