Nat’s idea is out of this world

Nat Thorn from Newminster Middle School who was the age group winner and second overall of a Centre For Life name an asteroid competition, which he called 'Neptune's Wrath'.
Nat Thorn from Newminster Middle School who was the age group winner and second overall of a Centre For Life name an asteroid competition, which he called 'Neptune's Wrath'.
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A MORPETH schoolboy’s inter-galactic idea has won him a prize in a major competition.

Nat Thorn came up with a hard rocking Vikings creation for the Centre for Life’s ‘name an asteroid’ contest in conjunction with the Times Eureka science supplement.

The 11-year-old was one of the four age group winners across the six to 16 age range with his name Wrath and original short story about the asteroid.

Each of the people on his asteroid has a musical instrument or microphone and together they make the loudest thrash metal rock music ever heard.

They are all Vikings who fell off the edge of the world into a hole covered and sealed by time and they are born and re-raised on Neptune before getting on board Wrath when it hits the planet. Their aim is to come to Earth to bring more rock.

Nat heard about the competition from one of his teachers at Newminster Middle School & Technology College.

“The idea came to me because my Uncle Ian had given me a guitar and we got talking about rock music and he mentioned that Viking and Norman people like to play heavy metal,” he said.

“I really enjoyed writing my entry. When I found out from my Dad that I had won my age group I was a bit surprised, but really pleased to have done so well.”

The winners have received an annual pass to the Centre for Life, worth £60, and their stories will appear within Eureka and on The Times and Newcastle attraction’s websites.

Editor of The Times Eureka David Edwards said: “I particularly liked Wrath, by Nat Thorn, with his asteroid full of guitar-wielding, drum-bashing human-like musicians, creating the only sound in the universe.”

Professor Naranjo of the Grupo de Astrofiscia Teorica at the Universidad de Los Andes in Colombia discovered asteroid 74400 in 1998.

After meeting Elin Roberts, Head of Public Engagement at The Centre for Life, at an international science conference he decided to gift the asteroid to it to mark its tenth anniversary last year.

The overall winner is seven-year-old Eve Canovan from Lancaster and the asteroid will be named Streaky.