A high quality performance

Cellist Gabriel Waite from Northern Sinfonia and Pianist Yoshie Kawamura performing at last Wednesday's Lunchtime Concert
Cellist Gabriel Waite from Northern Sinfonia and Pianist Yoshie Kawamura performing at last Wednesday's Lunchtime Concert

The third of the Autumn Series of lunchtime concerts at St George’s United Reformed Church in Morpeth featured cellist Gabriel Waite and pianist Yoshie Kawamura.

They combined to stunning effect in a performance of superb quality.

Gabriel is sub-principal cello in the Royal Northern Sinfonia Orchestra. He started learning the instrument at the age of 11 and hails from Chichester, West Sussex. He studied at the Northern College of Music in Manchester.

Yoshie, who was born in Japan, started playing the piano at the age of six and came to the UK when she was 11. She studied as a music scholar at Wells Cathedral School and proceeded to complete her Masters at the Guildhall School of Music.

The programme consisted of three widely differing works from three different centuries. The first by 19th Century composer Anton Dvorak was Silent Woods from a suite called From the Bohemian Forest.

Both cello and piano played in perfect harmony in the performance of a lovely and gentle composition, which reflected Dvorak at his very best.

The second composition from the 18th Century was the Suite No 1 in G for unaccompanied cello by German composer J.S. Bach.

This Suite in six short movements was a complete contrast in both style and tempo – the gentle movement being replaced by a very measured and ordered rhythm.

Gabriel’s playing was concise and came across with great style and verve. His playing of the Sarabande and the final Gigue were particularly impressive.

Gabriel was joined again by Yoshie for the concert’s main work, the Cello Sonata in C major by the 20th Century Russian composer Sergie Prokofiev.

The dark mood of the first movement (Andante) is lifted to an extent in the Moderato of the second movement and the theme of the final Allegro is hope and celebration, which results in a breathtaking passage of music.

For all three movements, it was a masterful performance from two most accomplished musicians.

BCP