Big crowd to see Amanda

Author Amanda Baker visiting Whytrig Middle School in Seaton Delaval to talk to pupils about her books as part of the school's 'Focus on Reading', which included showing them a dragon egg.
Author Amanda Baker visiting Whytrig Middle School in Seaton Delaval to talk to pupils about her books as part of the school's 'Focus on Reading', which included showing them a dragon egg.
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A MORPETH performer with many strings to her bow played to her biggest audience so far at an international conference.

The crowd of 1,300 was delighted with Amanda Baker’s unique show of character-based sketch style comedy poetry in the galleried concert hall at The Sage Gateshead.

The laughter flowed during the performance of her original routine as those in the audience were wowed with fast-paced character changes, verbal surprises, cheeky references and sharp social observation.

It has been an eventful 2013 for Amanda, who moved to Morpeth a number of years ago, beginning with the ‘blaunch’ of her final dragon book via her blog in January – browngirloutsidethering.blogspot.co.uk

Eleanor and the Dragon Runt is an adventure story aimed at middle school children and young teenagers and like the other two in the series, it is written under the pseudonym Adnam Arekab.

More excitement followed with the inclusion of her apocalyptic short story ‘The Remainder’ in Iron Press’s ROOT anthology of short stories showcasing writers based in the North East.

In the summer, after performing at the Doune festival, Amanda was spotted doing a brief set at a Laughing Cow venue in Birmingham and offered a showcase gig at the first ever UK Women in Comedy Festival, which took place in Manchester during October.

And her own Love Libraries events in Leamington Spa, where she grew up, Morpeth and Newcastle have been very successful.

She is also a cartoonist and an internationally short-listed poet as Amanda was among the finalists for the Bridport Poetry Prize a couple of years ago.

The piece that impressed the judges was a short verse about the death of her father and the enduring nature of grief.