Nine driving offences you didn’t know were illegal

There are numerous rules and restrictions around driving, ranging from alcohol consumption to speed limits.

Monday, 8th April 2019, 5:40 pm
Driving

But did you know these nine common driving habits are actually illegal?

This is a driving offence under rule 248 of the Highway Code, which states You MUST NOT park on a road at night facing against the direction of the traffic flow unless in a recognised parking space.
Flashing your lights to allow other drivers to go can be considered a driving offence if an accident results from doing so. Headlight flashes should only be used to warn drivers of your presence on the road.
Hogging the middle lane of the motorway is an offence, listed under careless driving. New laws introduced in 2013 allow police officers to hand out on-the-spot fines of 100 and three penalty points to lane-hoggers.
Beeping your horn between 11.30pm and 7am in a built-up area is an illegal driving offence that you may not be aware of.
The law states that those in charge of a motor vehicle should not be inebriated, which means you could still be charged with a driving offence for sleeping in your car drunk.
It is illegal to use a hand-held mobile to follow a map. You must fix it to your windscreen or dashboard in order to use smartphone navigation or a mapping app. You could receive a 200 fine and six points on your licence if caught in the act.
Registration plates must be visible at all times when a car is on the road. If your number plate is dirty and one or more of the numbers or letters on your plate can't be read, then you could be hit with a hefty fine.
It is illegal to splash someone as it amounts to driving without reasonable consideration for other persons. Those found guilty can face fines of up to 5,000 or even three points on their licence.
The Highway Code states that you must leave any animals in a broken-down vehicle when on the hard shoulder. If an accident is caused by letting your animal out you could face a driving offence charge.